Kelechi Nnoaham

Kelechi Nnoaham

I qualified with a medical degree from the University of Lagos, Nigeria in 1999, and worked in general medicine and infectious diseases until September 2003. Under the auspices of the Leverhulme scholarship, I obtained an MSc degree (with Distinction) in Tropical Medicine/International Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, winning the Frederick-Murgatroyd prize for the best performing student in the course. I thereafter joined the Oxford public health training rotations in January 2005 and in October 2006, completed a course of study for an MPH in Global Health Science (with Distinction) at the University of Oxford. I also completed a PhD in Public Health at University of Oxford in 2011 and have since been a visiting research associate with the University. I have pursued research interests in predictive modelling of UK fiscal policy and chronic diseases, secondary research synthesis and women’s health – principally chronic pelvic pain and endometriosis (see links to relevant publications on endometriosis in relation to study methodology, menarche, clinical prediction of disease, quality of life and work productivity). Some recent scientific publications – including a Cochrane SR, vitamin D and tuberculosis, colorectal screening, geodemographic segmentation for improving screening uptake and fiscal instruments in improving dietary behaviour – reflect my desire for my research interests to align to the current and emerging priorities of public health.

In November 2009, I took up a post as Consultant in Public health in Berkshire where I focused on health protection, public health intelligence, academic public health and training of Public Health specialty trainees and Foundation Year 2 doctors in public health. In March 2013, I took up post in Bristol City Council as Service Director for Public Health. In this current role, I support the Director of Public Health in their strategic role and provide professional and technical public health support to other public health staff in their areas of work. More specifically, I take keen interest in nurturing Public Health’s relationship with Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), leading the provision of the public health ‘core offer’ from the City Council to the CCGs and ensuring that the statutory and other duties of the City Council in respect of health protection, for example, are effectively provided on the basis of a dynamic public health intelligence function.

As a co-founder and Trustee of the Public Health Foundation of Nigeria, my desire is to make a contribution to building a health system in Nigeria energized by well-funded, sound and reliable pure and applied research relevant to the local health system.


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